Highlighted results

More than 80,000 people increased their access to justice

More than 7,300 jobs created in the agricultural sector

More than 200,000 children have benefited from school milk programmes, of which 100,000 were added during this reporting period

Additional sources

Factsheet Multiannual Country Strategy Uganda

Factsheet on the efforts of The Netherlands from 2019 to 2022

Openaid.nl

Overview of projects in Uganda

Introduction

Uganda currently hosts the largest number of refugees in Africa. More than 1.3 million refugees have entered Uganda from neighbouring countries, mainly South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The Netherlands provides targeted support to refugees and host communities. Providing psychosocial support, agricultural skills and entrepreneurial training addresses the short-term needs of refugees and host communities, while opportunities for income generation are being improved.

Uganda is a relatively stable country in a fragile region. However, Uganda’s governance landscape shows both positive and negative trends. Civil society is vibrant but the space needed to promote democratic governance and human rights is shrinking. Certain groups, including the LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) community, remain vulnerable to prejudice and exclusion. Uganda has a reasonably stable macroeconomic policy and its business climate is slowly improving, which provides opportunities to increase bilateral trade between Uganda and the Netherlands.

The Netherlands has aligned its strategy with Uganda’s ambition to become a middle-income country, as stipulated in Uganda’s ‘Vision 2040’ and its National Development Plan II. This is done by supporting the commercialisation of the agricultural sector and private sector development, but also by enhancing security and rule of law and empowering Ugandan citizens to engage in improved democratic governance. At the same time, it is necessary to address the high population growth and reduce unmet needs for contraception and the prevention of maternal mortality and sexual and gender-based violence.

Results 2019

The Netherlands’ programme in Uganda focuses on improving Security and the Rule of Law, Food and Nutrition Security, Trade and Investment, and increasingly on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). An Aid and Trade approach guides the economic-oriented programmes, in which the comparative advantages of Dutch trade and expertise are being used to achieve long-term development co-operation objectives.

The Netherlands has supported Uganda in making progress in improving the Justice Law and Order Sector (JLOS). This sector includes the judiciary, the police and prisons. An important result was the approval of the transitional justice policy by parliament, considering its relevance to many people in Uganda. Challenges remain, however, such as ensuring the accountability and credibility of justice institutions, including the judiciary and the police. A dual approach is applied, supporting the JLOS government institutions and, at the same time, supporting civil society efforts to deal with justice and legal affairs. The focus is on increasing rights awareness and access to justice, and supporting institutional and legal reform.

The food security activities contribute to improved productivity and incomes, job creation (particularly for youths) and better nutrition for children. Support to the agriculture sector has contributed to the creation of more than 7,359 jobs, both at farming level as well as in processing and service provision. The Netherlands’ support to the dairy sector resulted in 100,000 additional children benefiting from the primary school milk programme.

Results by theme

Security and rule of Law Food security SRHR Private sector development

Featured project Uganda

Securing Land Tenure for Improved Food Security in Select Areas in Uganda – Global Land Tenure Network (GLTN – UN HABITAT)

This pilot project combines two of the Netherlands’ priorities in Uganda: Food Security and Rule of Law. The aim is to improve land tenure security for about 3,000 smallholder farmers, particularly women and youths. Land disputes are manifold and an important reason for conflicts and court cases. Securing land rights will enhance agricultural productivity and therefore increase food security and incomes. The strategy is two-fold: 1. Strengthening capacities at local government level leading to Certificates of Customary Ownership (CCO) being issued to secure land tenure rights and improve the use of land and wetlands; and 2. Influencing policies and institutions at national level to create an enabling environment. The first year of implementation was 2018. About 4,000 (2,318 male and 1,762 female) farmers have been sensitised; capacities of local actors have been strengthened; 1,531 CCO applications have been submitted, of which 878 parcels have been adjudicated and mapped; and 35 disputes related to boundary and succession rights have so far been reported with 11 having been resolved. Farmers show a huge interest in obtaining a CCO.

Security and rule of Law

The results in context

The results in context

Under the fourth Justice Law and Order Sector (JLOS) Sector Development Plan (SDP), the priority is on empowering people by building trust and upholding rights. The SDP is funded by the Ugandan government and various donors, including the Netherlands. A five-year arrangement with the government of Uganda was signed late in 2017 to provide a grant of EUR 10 million. In 2019, this contribution was increased by EUR 7 million because, despite the good results achieved by the SDP, the budget turned out to be inadequate to achieve all of the planned results.

As confirmed during the JLOS Annual Review of October 2019, overall progress was satisfactory. The creation of a committee to reduce the case backlog has achieved considerable results and the passing of the transitional justice policy was a long-awaited achievement.

Main challenges

In spite of all efforts, corruption remains a challenge and one that the sector has not yet been able to effectively combat.

There are still serious incidents of brutalities and human rights violations happening in the sector.

In general, room for opposition parties and NGOs to express themselves is expected to shrink with the elections coming up in early 2021. This will pose a threat to the results that have been achieved so far but it also shows the importance of continued dialogue with the sector.

Successful pilot

See above “Securing Land Tenure project” with the Global Land Tenure Network. This pilot project is an example that combines two of the Netherlands’ priorities in Uganda: Food Security and Rule of Law.

Results

Indicator

Number of people with increased access to justice

Score

81511

Progress

On track

Dutch contributions to both the JLOS sector and the Democratic Governance Facility (DGF) contribute to increasing access to justice for the people of Uganda. The JLOS sector does this by creating justice centres in the regions, giving people easier access to the police, and the judiciary. The DGF enables more than 80 state and non-state partners to strengthen democratic governance, to request better access to justice and to support civilians in their demand for improved accountability. Together, the DGF and JLOS have provided 81,551 people with easier access to justice.

Food security

The results in context

The focus of the Food Security programme in Uganda is on two areas: improving incomes in the agricultural sector and increasing the availability of and access to food. The Netherlands is paying great attention to the role of the private sector in agriculture.

Weather and climate have a significant impact on food security results. There were droughts in the second half of 2018, while the rains in 2019 were late and prolonged without the required dry period during the course of the year. The impact of all this provides a mixed picture. Annual crops were affected while perennial crops and pasture benefited. The results of the production of improved seeds were therefore lower than expected. The dairy sector did very well but oversupply resulted in a drop in farm gate prices. Nevertheless, most projects supported more farmers and companies. Good progress was made in developing the service sector. Increasingly, companies are providing advice and equipment to farmers and processors. The Netherlands is investing in stronger resilience in order to better handle weather- and climate-related issues.

The Netherlands is supporting the Ugandan Government policy to commercialise the agriculture sector. However, the Ugandan Government has a tendency to intervene directly in the market, instead of focusing on regulation and creating the right incentives for the private sector. The Netherlands holds the position of chair of the Development Partners in the agriculture sector and raised these issues in its policy dialogue with the government.

Results

Indicator

Number of people with improved access to healthy/diverse food (Incremental)

Score

99,867

Progress

On track

The results on improved nutrition were basically achieved by the primary school milk programme. The success of the programme can be explained by the great interest shown by parents, the relatively low-cost approach (parents pay for the milk), the well-designed support (utensils, clean water jars) provided to the schools and the organisational involvement of the District Education Department. The programme is being extended to other products (pro-biotic yoghurt) and targets groups (preschools). There is great national interest in the programme.

Around 100,000 additional children benefited from the programme in 2018. At the end of 2018, 200,849 children were regularly receiving milk in schools, supported by the Netherlands (figures for 2019 not yet available). The cumulative number of participating primary schools at the end of 2018 was 637, which corresponds to one third of all schools in the project working area.

Indicator

Number of family farms (crop/livestock/fish producers) with increased productivity and/or income

Score

109,525

Progress

Progress, not on track

Increased income resulted from improved management through training, the use of better inputs (improved seeds) and better and more profitable connection with the market. For example, the use of improved seed varieties increased yields and resilience to adverse weather conditions. The introduction of a Quality-Based-Milk-Payment-System resulted in better milk prices for farmers and contracts between farmers and processors resulted in higher incomes and more income security. Income was also generated through support to the service providers in the various sectors. Similarly, job creation for youths resulted in improved income, although at a slower pace.

Income levels can differ between the various sub-sectors. They are also influenced by several factors and one positive effect (increased production) can be negated by a negative effect (price reduction).

Indicator

Number of jobs supported in agricultural chains/sectors

Score

7,359

Progress

On track

Jobs have been created both in the broader sector development programmes and in the dedicated youth employment programme. In the dairy and seed sector development projects, the jobs are a result of increased employment at farm level, generated by the more favourable circumstances created by the projects. In addition, jobs have been created in processing and service provision, due to the increased volume of marketed produce. In the dairy sector, the observed reduction in jobs at farm level (fewer cows per farmer), was reversed by an increase in new jobs (intensified management).

The sustained creation of jobs by the Youth Employment programme was particularly successful when the skills provided focused on job opportunities in expanding agricultural sectors (e.g. dairy) or when a conducive business environment was offered for self-employment.

SRHR

The results in context

With a population growth rate of 3% per annum, Uganda has a fast-growing and young population. At the same time, a significant number of women are unable to access birth control measures. This prevents them from being able to decide if and when to have children. Other pressing issues include the high number of teenage pregnancies and early marriages.

Some political leaders are increasingly acknowledging and supporting the need for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). In addition, the new National Population Policy acknowledges the need for SRHR for young people as an essential element for development. This creates a positive environment to further strengthen political support in this field.

In the reporting period, more than 6,000 young people (both refugees and host population) were provided with modern contraceptive services/methods and almost 350,000 people including youths were provided with SRH information and services.

Private sector development

The results in context

Increase in inclusive business co-operation between Uganda and the Netherlands

The Aid and Trade agenda continues to create business opportunities for Dutch companies based in the Netherlands, the East African region and within Uganda. The diversity of existing and emerging businesses ranges from agro-food, tourism and consulting to logistics and renewable energy. This demonstrates the increasing business ties between the two countries.

The annual Harvest Money Expo, an agribusiness exhibition and a spin-off of Uganda’s Best Farmers Competition, offers a platform that directly links Uganda’s agribusinesses to Dutch suppliers of productivity-enhancing technology, know-how and agro-machinery. The number of Ugandan companies with Dutch business relations has increased.

The embassy brokers business deals and Joint Business Ventures between Dutch and Ugandan counterparts through facilitation and lobbying and by providing strategic market information. Improving the quality of the business environment in Uganda remains a core objective. Dutch companies are not just suppliers, they are also setting up plants in Uganda.

The number of Ugandan companies with Dutch business relations continued to grow steadily in 2019. Trade and investment facilities at the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO), such as the Dutch Infrastructure Development Fund, Impact Cluster Financing and the Demonstration Facility, have supported the entry of Dutch companies into Uganda.

The Netherlands remains one of the biggest markets for Ugandan goods in the European Union. Agro-food, tourism, renewable energy and information technology present a number of opportunities for Dutch companies. The number of Ugandan companies interested in Dutch agricultural inputs, such as seeds and irrigation equipment, is increasing. Capital, knowledge and management skills are key barriers to local entrepreneurship.

Promotion of the Dutch brand in Uganda took place through a successful Best Farmers Competition and Harvest Money Expo, including an agro-trade mission with 32 Dutch-Ugandan companies involved. Dutch companies were able to make good sales of equipment and machinery.

Membership of the Netherlands Uganda Trade and Investment Platform (NUTIP) increased by 10%. The Netherlands Embassy, together with the platform, has organised consultations between the Ugandan authorities (Ministry of Trade, Industry and Co-operatives) and Dutch companies in Uganda.

Results

Indicator

Increase in inclusive business co-operation between Uganda and the Netherlands

Score

Progress

On track

The Aid and Trade agenda continues to create business opportunities for Dutch companies based in the Netherlands, the East African region and within Uganda. The diversity of existing and emerging businesses ranges from agro-food, tourism and consulting to logistics and renewable energy. This demonstrates the increasing business ties between the two countries.

The annual Harvest Money Expo, an agribusiness exhibition and a spin-off of Uganda’s Best Farmers Competition, offers a platform that directly links Uganda’s agribusinesses to Dutch suppliers of productivity-enhancing technology, know-how and agro-machinery. The number of Ugandan companies with Dutch business relations has increased.

The embassy brokers business deals and Joint Business Ventures between Dutch and Ugandan counterparts through facilitation and lobbying and by providing strategic market information. Improving the quality of the business environment in Uganda remains a core objective. Dutch companies are not just suppliers, they are also setting up plants in Uganda.

The number of Ugandan companies with Dutch business relations continued to grow steadily in 2019. Trade and investment facilities at the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO), such as the Dutch Infrastructure Development Fund, Impact Cluster Financing and the Demonstration Facility, have supported the entry of Dutch companies into Uganda.

Background and future Uganda

Background

The Netherlands’ support is aligned with the Government’s policies. However, to achieve the results as envisaged in the Multi Annual Country Strategy 2019-2022, the Netherlands is not only working with the Government of Uganda but also with NGOs, Civil Society Organisations, UN organisations and the private sector.

Glimpse into the future

The Netherlands’ strategy aims to contribute to the development of a stable and democratic Uganda, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals and with respect for human rights. It contributes to Uganda’s ambition to become a middle-income country, as stated in Uganda’s Vision 2040 document.

The Netherlands will continue to support democratisation and the strengthening of the rule of law.

Given the demographic developments and the expertise and experience of the Netherlands, the improvement of family planning services has been given more attention, which will hopefully produce results in the nearer future. The Netherlands will continue to support the development of more sustainable and durable food supply systems by providing Dutch expertise in agriculture. Greater attention will be paid to adapting to the impact of climate change.

The Netherlands will also continue its work on the commercialisation of the agricultural sector. This sector is an important engine for the Ugandan economy and contributes to better food and nutrition security. The ambition is to further increase Dutch-Ugandan investment and trade in a way that is socially and environmentally responsible.

More specific attention will be given to women’s rights and gender equality, climate change and the links between humanitarian aid and development in the long term.

The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic is most likely severe. The extent to which this affects our current and future projects is still unknown.

Additional sources

You can find how the budget was allocated in 2019 and which projects were funded on the budget website.

  1. Visit the website
    Programme budget Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation
  2. Select financial year 2019
Multi Annual Country Strategy

Page on current Netherlands Multi Annual Country Strategy for Uganda.

Countries page on Dutch government site

Page with fact sheets on the key focus areas of support to Uganda

Facebook page

Follow the Embassy of Uganda on Facebook

Results Security and rule of Law

Download PDF with results for Security and rule of Law in Uganda

Results Food security

Download PDF with results for Food security in Uganda

Expenditure Embassy by channel

Metric

Expenditure Embassy by theme

Metric

The budget in this figure is for the year 2019 and does not completely correspond with the results on this page, which have been collected between Oct 2018 and Oct 2019. More information on this can be found on the 'About the results report' page.