Highlighted results

About 32,000 additional people gained access to safe sanitary facilities, bringing the total for the ongoing SEHATI sanitation project to some 327,000.

5,241 people gained access to justice and/or claimed their rights with help of legal schools, paralegals and lawyers supported through the rule of law programme.

Additional sources

Openaid.nl

Overview of projects in Indonesia

Introduction

In the 2018-2019 reporting period, the Netherlands continued to focus on sectors in which Dutch expertise can add specific value: security and rule of law, water and agriculture. Dutch know-how in these areas can be used to contribute to the realisation of several SDGs. Within and outside these sectors, the Netherlands also contributed to private sector development and education. For the purpose of this report we focus on two sectors: water and security and rule of law.

In 2018-2019, Indonesia managed to maintain growth of around 5%, which is consistent with previous years. Nevertheless, challenges remain in terms of ease of doing business and these are hampering development through trade and foreign investment. In the field of security and rule of law, important processes have been unfolding. Among others, the Supreme Court has begun to develop a new long-term strategy. Dutch co-operation is closely linked to this, for example through co-operation in the field of planning and budgeting. Additionally, 1,600 new judges have begun their education – the first batch for many years.

Politically, 2019 was an eventful year due to the presidential elections that took place in April. The largest single-day election process in the world proceeded well. The following months were less calm, with demonstrations linked to the election result, new legislation being debated in parliament and the situation in Papua.

Results 2019

Water

The two remaining sanitation programmes (USDP2 and SEHATI) have contributed concretely to the planning, budgeting and implementation of sanitation and hygiene programmes in their respective programme areas, as well as beyond, through replication. Intensive collaboration with central, municipal and district governments and building their capacity have proven to be an effective approach.

Security and Rule of Law

The rule of law programme has made significant steps in this period. Apart from the continuation of efforts to provide better access to justice for vulnerable groups and for the improvement of community policing in Papua, West Papua and Maluku, in 2018-2019 a number of projects showed significant results. Studiecentrum Rechtspleging (SSR), for example, was the main partner of the Indonesian training centre for judges in the development of the new education programme for 1,600 new judges (the Dutch RAIO programme). Significant changes to the system of education, assessment and monitoring were developed with the support of SSR. Another collaboration initiated the development of standard operating procedures for the use of electronic evidence in the Indonesian legal system.

Results by theme

Water Security and rule of Law

Featured project Indonesia

Improvement of access to justice for marginalised groups (Rule of Law Fund)

Indonesia has specific legislation on legal aid. It has made improving access to justice for all a priority of its development policy. The legislation has been very effective, although there have been challenges in its implementation. Firstly, the legislation focuses on enabling a proper defence for people accused of a crime. This means that victims of crimes or injustice cannot access free legal aid. Secondly, the law focuses primarily on people who cannot access legal aid for financial reasons, meaning that people who struggle to get legal aid for other reasons cannot benefit from the same support. Thirdly, the number of legal aid providers is still far too limited to help all those in need.

The rule of law fund supported by the Netherlands includes a programme that focuses on these challenges. Provincial legal aid legislation is being developed to expand the legal aid available in the provinces that need it most, while proposals have also been developed (and lobbied) to amend the national legal aid law. In addition, legal service providers were assisted in attracting and training additional legal aid officers, in order to greatly expand the number of people that can be assisted.

One of the provinces in which the programme has been implemented is Papua, where the gap between the supply of and demand for legal aid has been largest. This video shows how the access to justice project has helped in providing better and more legal aid in this province.

Water

The results in context

Rural sanitation and urban flood management, in particular for the city of Jakarta, have continued to be important focus areas of the Netherlands’ support in the water sector. More than 30 million Indonesians still do not use toilets, while in Jakarta about 4 million people are not, or are still not sufficiently, protected against the risks of floods.

The Netherlands-supported USDP2 and SIMAVI/SEHATI projects have been providing capacity building services and support to government and non-government partners and the private sector to end open defecation and move on to improving other hygiene practices, such as hand washing with soap, menstrual hygiene and waste management. These activities are designed to support the national government sanitation programme, known as STBM (Community-led Total Sanitation). Central and local government institutions and other sector partners greatly appreciate the substantial strategic support provided by the Netherlands.

As agreed under a trilateral MoU signed in 2016 and further amended and extended in 2019, Dutch and Korean Technical Assistance continue to provide support to the Government of Indonesia in the preparation of an Integrated Flood Safety Plan for short-, medium- and long-term flood protection measures in Jakarta. The Netherlands’ support is much appreciated by the Indonesian Government and the Dutch water sector is considered a trusted adviser in the fields of flood protection and coastal restoration.

Results

Indicator

Number of additional people reached with sustainable access to and use of improved sanitation facilities.

Score

23,000

Progress

On track

The key to the approach of the two sanitation projects USDP2 and SIMAVI/SEHATI is working closely with and providing formal and informal (on the job) training and capacity building to central and local government and non-governmental partners. Up to and including 2018, close to 465 organisations had benefited from different support services (TA, training) and more than 7,000 people had received training in one form or another. As a result of this approach, these projects have impacted the national sanitation programme not just in the projects’ own areas but also beyond.

In 2018 23,000 people were reached, bringing the total since 2012 to 1.67 million.

23.000 people
Indicator

Number of people in Jakarta benefiting from reduced flood risk

Score

2.5 million people

Progress

Progress, not on track

Although Jakarta is still experiencing frequent and serious floods, an estimated 2.5 million people are already believed to be benefiting from reduced flood risk as a result of past investments in flood protection infrastructure. Some of these investments have been made based on data, plans and designs developed with the Netherlands’ assistance over the past 10-12 years.

During the reporting period, Dutch and Korean consultants supported the Ministry of Public Works in developing an Integrated Flood Safety Plan (IFSP). The plan involves the further extension, heightening and strengthening of the existing sea walls and river dikes, an improved drinking water supply and reduction of land subsidence, cleaner rivers and ultimately the construction of an open sea wall, which will result in higher safety levels for all 4 million people still at risk.

While good progress has been made in the development of the IFSP, much remains to be done in gaining government approval (which was delayed in 2018-2019 due to the provincial and national elections, among other factors) and securing the necessary financial and institutional capacity for implementation.

Target: tripartite co-operation under NCICD2 between Indonesia, the Netherlands and KOICA is resulting in a plan, which if and once implemented will better protect 4 million people living in Jakarta against future floods.

2.5 million people

Security and rule of Law

The results in context

The Rule of Law sector in Indonesia finds itself in a long-term reform process, gradually trying to move towards a system and processes that increase both quality and legal certainty. The Supreme Court has been taking a leading role in spearheading such reforms and regularly exchanges experiences with the Dutch Supreme Court on such topics. Consistency of rulings remains a challenge in the Indonesian legal system. Digitalisation, the use of jurisprudence, improvement of the education of new judges and the provision of continuous legal education for other judges should contribute to greater consistency. Dutch collaboration is involved in all of these fields. More than 3 million rulings have been digitised, for example, and a system is being developed to digitally search for relevant case law. The Netherlands and its partners in Indonesia also play an important role in the lobby to advance the use of case law in legal education and in courts. In December 2018, Dutch partners (the President of the Hoge Raad and several deans of Dutch university law faculties) organised an important discussion among Indonesian university legal faculties on the use of case law in legal education. Since then, a number of universities have moved ahead to include case law in some of their study programmes.

At the same time, equal access to justice for vulnerable groups remains a challenge, despite relatively effective legislation, such as the legal aid law. The Netherlands’ rule of law programme has focused both on increasing of the number of legal aid providers (lawyers as well as paralegals) and on amending legal aid legislation in order to broaden the group of people that can access legal aid provided by the government.

Results

Indicator

Number of beneficiaries with access to justice

Score

5,241

Progress

On track

The Netherlands supports multiple projects in Indonesia that focus on improving access to justice. These projects mainly focus on environmental rights (often for communities that have conflicts with companies) and on access to justice for vulnerable people in society (people with disabilities, women, minorities). Through the support of these projects, people have gained access to justice when they would otherwise have been unable.

Number people

Background and future Indonesia

Background

Water

Thanks to the support provided by Simavi (SHAW) and SNV (STBM Lampung), close to an additional 1.67 million people in Sumatra and East Indonesia have gained sustainable access to sanitary facilities since 2012. Close co-operation with and capacity building of local government and non-government partners has proven to be a powerful approach to improving the planning, budgeting and implementation of national sanitation programmes. In the second phase of the National Capital Integrated Coastal Development (NCICD2) project, good progress has been made in the development of a new Integrated Flood Safety Plan (IFSP) to reduce the risk of floods in Jakarta. The current plan responds to environmental and social concerns raised earlier and offers technical solutions and acceleration strategies for flood safety measures, reduction of land subsidence, drinking water supply and sanitation. Progress towards a concrete investment decision has however been slow thus far, due in particular to provincial and national elections.

Security and Rule of Law

The Netherlands and Indonesia are strategic partners with a shared past. Due to their shared legal heritage, the added value of legal co-operation between the Netherlands and Indonesia is highly recognised. The rule of law programme works through a combination of support to local NGOs, research and lobbying for legal reform, capacity building and peer-to-peer collaboration between Dutch and Indonesian legal institutions. Through relations built over many years, very effective advice on legal reform and legal education can be provided. Even if the individual steps achieved sometimes seem small, together they can ultimately lead to fundamental changes in the legal system. For most of our programmes, close co-operation with local authorities and community leaders has proven to be the key to success.

Glimpse into the future

Water

The SNV Lampung programme ended in late 2017. Since the activities of Simavi (with the new SEHATI programme) and the second phase of the USDP will be phased out by the end of 2020, in their exit strategies these programmes will continue to focus on consolidation and the sustainability of results and approaches.

Regarding the Netherlands’ technical assistance (TA) to Jakarta coastal flood safety (through the second phase of the National Capital Integrated Coastal Development Programme - NCICD2), which is also being phased out by the end of 2020, the Netherlands TA input will also increasingly focus on knowledge management and institutional/capacity development.

Security and Rule of Law

The rule of law programme was in its final year in 2019, although a small transition facility will remain in place for a few more years. This transition facility focuses on a number of long-term relationships between the Dutch and Indonesian legal institutions, which will continue their strategic engagement in certain key reform processes. This includes the collaboration between the Hoge Raad and the Indonesian Supreme Court, and the collaboration between the Dutch and Indonesian Ombudsman.

The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic is most likely severe. The extent to which this affects our current and future projects is still unknown.

Additional sources

You can find how the budget was allocated in 2019 and which projects were funded on the budget website.

  1. Visit the website
    Programme budget Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation
  2. Select financial year 2019
Country page on Dutch Government Site

Webpage on The Netherlands and Indonesia

Results Water

Download PDF with results for Water in Indonesia

Results Security and rule of Law

Download PDF with results for Security and rule of Law in Indonesia

Expenditure Embassy by channel

Metric

Expenditure Embassy by theme

Metric

The budget in this figure is for the year 2019 and does not completely correspond with the results on this page, which have been collected between Oct 2018 and Oct 2019. More information on this can be found on the 'About the results report' page.